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Up To 50% Off miniBit And miniVerb By AudioThing

Plugin Boutique have reduced the price of both miniBit and miniVerb by AudioThing. miniBit is now only £8.95/$11.67 (usually £17.95/$23.40). mjniVerb is now only £8.95/$11.67 (usually £16.99/$22.15).

miniBit

miniBit is an 8-bit/chiptune style synthesizer plugin that emulates the sound of 80s game consoles and retro computers.

It features a main oscillator with 18 waveforms paired with a tunable sub-oscillator (square wave). The waveforms are not bandlimited and will produce aliasing. Same of the waveforms were carefully created and edited with an Amiga 1200, while others were meticulously recreated from the sounds of the best classic games that we have collected over the years.

You can create all kind of noisy and retro sounds with the built-in bitcrusher, delay section and filter. You can also use the synced 8 Steps Stepper/Sequencer with multiple destinations.
From noisy, snare-like steps to ambient subs, miniBit has many uses beyond what one expects from a chip tune synth.

Features include:

  • 18 Waveforms + Sub Oscillator
  • Poly and Mono mode with Glide
  • 2-poles LowPass/HighPass Filter
  • Delay and BitCrusher effects
  • LFO with multiple destinations
  • Volume and Pitch Envelopes
  • 8 Steps Stepper with multiple destinations
  • 128 Presets + Preset randomizer

miniVerb

miniVerb is an 8-bit/chiptune and lofi reverb effect inspired by the sound of 80s game consoles and retro computers.

Early consoles didn’t have much power for DSP effects, so the video game composers at that time had to improvise. The most common way to add a sense of space/reverb to the sound was to sacrifice one of the internal tracks to play a delayed version of the original sound, essentially using a slapback echo to add depth.

The technique evolved and eventually, consoles started to take advantage of more power for real internal effects.

miniVerb recreates that classic digital echo/reverb sound, made famous by iconic consoles such as the NES and SNES, topping it with two flters (post/pre), vibrato, and crusher (bit crusher, downsampler, pitch shifter).

The Echo Section can be used to simulate the tricks used in early video game consoles to add a sense of space/reverb to the sounds.

The most common way was to sacrifice one of the internal tracks of the sound chip to play a delayed version of the original track, essentially creating a slapback echo effect.

To achieve this NES-like reverb sound, you can use a single delay line, very short time, no feedback, and width set to mono.

To simulate a 90s fake reverb/echo (like the SNES) instead, you can play with longer times and add some feedback to simulate a reverb tail.

For a more modern approach, you can switch the Echo to Double Delay Line by clicking on the blue button (in the top-left corner) and increase the width to a wider setting. miniVerb was inspired by the sound of classic game consoles and retro computers of the 80s and 90s.

Features include:

  • Pre/Post Filter (LP/HP)
  • Echo (single/double mode)
  • Vibrato
  • Crusher (bit-crusher, downsampler, pitch shifter)
  • 45 Presets
  • Preset randomizer

Both plugins are available to PC and Mac users (VST2, VST3, AU and AAX).

For more information on both deals, click here: 

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